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    "The formation of children’s brains happen - the large percentage of the development of their brain and executive reasoning - happens in the ages of three to five. " - Kathy Bruck, CEO of Pre-K 4 SA 

     
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    Early Warning Signs of Autism<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space: pre;">		</span>
     
     

    EARLY WARNING SIGNS OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS


    0-4 months of age

    • Little to no eye contact
    • Does not look at people when they are making social “sounds” such as humming or clapping
    • Shows more interest in objects than people
    • Does not show a social smile (smiling back to someone who smiles at them, without being cooed at or touched)


      5 to 12 months of age

    • Does not combine eye gaze with smiling
    • Does not babble (or the babble does not sound like “talking”)
    • Does not look at something interesting, like an airplane, then look to parent and back at the airplane to try to share his/her interest
    • Does not follow the parents eye contact when they point out an object and say, “look at the airplane!”
    • Does not respond to their own name
    • Does not point using the index finger
    • Does not show a caring or concerned reaction to other people crying


      12 to 24 months of age

    • Does not point to share interests, such as pointing to an airplane
    • Does not use single words by 16 months; no two-word spontaneous phrases (“go car,” “look doggie”) by 24 months


      Other Developmental Signs

    • May develop language normally and then lose these skills
    • Repetitive body movements (hand flapping, spinning)
    • Fixation upon a single object, such as a spoon or book
    • Cannot tolerate change, such as a new toothbrush or a new lamp
    • Oversensitivity to texture, lights and/or sounds
    • Delayed motor skills (late walking, riding a tricycle or learning to jump)
    • Does not interact with peers as expected, such as asking for friends to come over, playing together, taking turns and interacting